Thursday, July 31, 2014

Temple Of R'lyeh Cookie Jar

Let's get this out of the way right now. If someone were to say "Hey, here's a cool Cthulhu-themed cookie jar!" my reaction would normally be "Er...that's nice." Just not my cup of tea. Or crock o' crumpets, as the case may be.

But this? This is different. Ceramic artist Andrew Tarrant brings us this absolutely spectacular Temple of R'lyeh Cookie Jar. The sculpted details are perfectly themed and the craftsmanship speaks for itself. I just wish he'd called it something like a "funerary urn" so I didn't feel a twinge of guilt for liking it.


10 comments:

gndn said...

Wow. That is exquisite!

CoastConFan said...

Mr Tarrant is being very modest when he says it took two days. That is not taking into account designing the components and making the molds for them. Then making the master for the body of the vase and then the mold. Then the component parts are cast. While they are all still in the leather stage, the strap designs and appliqués are adhered to the body. Then the whole thing has to be meticulously cleaned up.

The pottery has to perfectly dry before being fired. Then firing has to be done. After that if there is any glazing done, then that is done and then another firing. If the finish is applied, as a wash with the natural clay showing, then there is not second firing, I can’t tell from the photos if this is so.

In any case the work actually involved weeks of preparation, with the planning, manufacturing, and casting of components. The “two days” is misleading, it’s really a ton of work and I can appreciate the amount of planning and logistics it takes to make a piece like this. There is at least a month minimum between the beginning and the final product on the original.

It’s really an urn shape, although through whimsy, Mr Tarrant calls it a cookie jar. Maybe it can be filled with star shaped cookie – the stars are right! Note: you can add an Elder sign to your stars if you like. Get ready for the Autumn Equinox.

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/star-shaped-snickerdoodles-10000001875826/

http://www.pillsbury.com/recipes/holiday-star-cookies/5a79cf99-d6c7-4c96-a957-387b09d28b94

Propnomicon said...

@ gndn

Isn't it? As CoastConFan pointed out, the amount of work that went into it is intimidating.

@ CoastConFan

The level of skill on display is impressive, but it's the idea that THE WHOLE THING COULD BE DESTROYED AT ANY STEP IN THE PROCESS that really gets me. Dealing with that constant threat has to require a very steady personality.

CoastConFan said...

@ Propnomicom, yes it can be spoiled at any step during the process, but that is the thing about creating something you really like. You have to take chances on yourself.

On the flip side, terracotta works can easily survive thousands of years, even under adverse conditions like being under water or buried. It's surprising how much pottery has and can survive 3,000 plus years.

El Faraon said...

In my religion this would be called a Tinaja. Google "Tinaja de Olokun".Could lead you down interesting speculative paths.
Bendicion

CoastConFan said...

@ El Faraon The Benin have a very rich culture and many of their artifacts are spectacular. I can see how this Cthulhu vase would make you think of one of the magnificently decorated pieces. Prop makers would do well to mine this vein of cultural works.

http://www.nairaland.com/582176/benin-art-architecture/17

http://wwwdelivery.superstock.com/WI/223/475/PreviewComp/SuperStock_475-1969.jpg

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m_GlcBRWJ8E/TsV_slUf5OI/AAAAAAAACGc/-H30UDcBCgA/s1600/benin_bm_5556.JPG

El Faraon said...

@CoastConFan Completely agree, although my personal experience is of the Afro-Caribbean variety, I have a particular fondness of the Benin bronze work though. BTW, will you be attending DragonCon next month?

CoastConFan said...

@El Faraon No, I'll have to give DragonCon a miss again this year, although I may be able to go to CONtraflow in New Orleans this October 2014.

http://contraflowscifi.org/

Trespasser said...

Thanks for all the lovely comments about my "Cookie Jar", glad you can see my sense of humor there. One note, The body and lid are hand thrown on the potters wheel and nothing has been "cast" here. All the decorative sprigs are from traditional press moulds that I have created myself, except for the shells, which were from my fish tank.

zonei said...

Where do you buy these?